Asbestos: The Deadly Threat to DIYers

What You Don't Know CAN Kill You

asbestos

Today Rachel Lynch from the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance will share with us about a deadly fiber that most people don’t know enough about.

What DIYers don’t know about asbestos just might kill them. Tiny particles of asbestos, a naturally occurring fibrous material used in construction in the 1970s, can enter a person’s lungs and cause Mesothelioma. This rare form of cancer only comes from contact with asbestos.

Shockingly, although we’ve known for years that asbestos causes cancer, other countries import this toxin into our country on a regular basis.

What is Asbestos?

At first, no one knew about the side effects of asbestos. Its cheap and strong qualities seemed to provide the perfect tool for myriad construction applications. After all, it has the ability to resist heat, fire and electricity.

The material can be found in wallpaper, cement, insulation, floor/ceiling tiles, pipes, furnaces, and broilers among other building materials. In addition, the toxin was used frequently in the military and ship building. Unfortunately, when inhaled, it can cause cancer.

What is Mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. There are four different types of mesothelioma—pleural, peritoneal, pericardial and testicular. Pleural mesothelioma occurs in the lungs and is the most common form of the disease. Pleural mesothelioma accounts for 70 to 80 percent of all diagnosed mesothelioma cases.

asbestosEach type of the disease presents itself with varying symptoms. Due to the variation, it is extremely difficult for patients to get an accurate and timely diagnosis. Unfortunately, all too often patients receive an accurate mesothelioma diagnosis only after the cancer has progressed into the third or fourth stage. Most patients are first misdiagnosed with a more common respiratory illness such as the flu or pneumonia. To make matters worse, mesothelioma has a long latency period—it typically does not manifest until 20 to 40 years after asbestos exposure occurs.

Most often those diagnosed with mesothelioma have only 12 to 21 months to live. Prognosis can improve with early diagnosis. As previously stated, though, most cases are not confirmed until the third or fourth stage when it is too late for treatment. At that point, palliative care is the only option.

How Does Asbestos Exposure Occur?

Three distinct waves of asbestos exposure have occurred in the United States. The first wave of exposure impacted those handling asbestos in their occupations—mainly men working in mining, military personnel, and tradesmen. The second wave of exposure impacted the workers’ families. Those who worked with asbestos brought home the asbestos fibers on their clothing—unknowingly exposing their families when particles fell all their clothing and family members inhaled them.

The third—and current wave—of asbestos exposure has a close connection to the DIY craze. Many homes and schools have asbestos in them. The material is relatively harmless when left alone. However, when Do-it-Yourselfers dig into a project, they often disturb the material and release asbestos dust into the air. Anyone nearby could inhale the fibers and end up with mesothelioma

If you have an older home, consult an asbestos professional to have your home inspected before beginning any remodeling projects.asbestos

International Use of Asbestos

While asbestos use in the United States has tapered off, there are parts of the world where the asbestos trade thrives.

Although the last asbestos mine in the United States shut down in 2002, manufacturers in the United States still wanted to use the cheap and resistant material. With the United States no longer mining and manufacturing our own asbestos and asbestos products, the nation’s imports provide a major driving force in the growth in the international asbestos trade.

Other countries have imported more than 8 million pounds of asbestos into the United States since 2006. The majority of that—more than 7.6 million pounds of asbestos—arrived at the ports of New Orleans and Houston. Other ports receiving shipments of asbestos and asbestos products include Newark, Long Beach and Los Angeles. From those ports the toxic material travels out to 29 different states by either truck or rail. So, while the ban on mining asbestos protects U.S. miners from occupational asbestos exposure, the toxin still makes its way to all corners of the country and continues to put Americans in great danger.

Why is Asbestos still legal?

After reading all this you might be wondering—If we know that asbestos contains a cancer-causing toxin why do we still use it? I can assure you it’s not for lack of trying.

Beginning in the 1970s, when researchers discovered that asbestos causes cancer, the Environmental Protection Agency began attempting to ban the carcinogenic material. Unfortunately, they didn’t find success.

Almost 40 years later, the Senate unanimously passed the Ban Asbestos in America Act. Unfortunately, the House of Representatives squashed the bill and it never made it to the President.

“It’s reprehensible that Congress has allowed the man-made asbestos crisis to continue,” says Linda Reinstein, president of the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which represents asbestos victims. “Each year, up to 15,000 Americans die from preventable mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases and imports still continue.“

What Now?

Until researchers discover a cure for Mesothelioma, prevention and raising awareness provide the best recourses for early treatment. If you or a loved one believe they have experienced asbestos exposure, visit a medical professional.

By raising awareness of Mesothelioma, people may realize they have been exposed to it and seek help before symptoms arise. A simple mention that you may have been exposed to asbestos could enable early detection, significantly increasing your chances of survival.

asbestosRachel Lynch is the Press and Media Coordinator for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance, a leading authority in providing information about asbestos exposure and its link to mesothelioma.

 

 

 

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A Caregiver You Know Might Need This Book

Dr. Bengtson Releases a Hope Prevails Bible Study Guide

BengtsonNot Knowing That I Stood in Need

When my husband miraculously recovered from non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma with Central Nervous System involvement I knew I should feel grateful and blessed. I did, mostly. But a heavy blanket of depression crept over me and sucked the color out of my days. I felt as if an angry monster lurked inside, ready to lash out at any moment. I had no idea that I needed something.

It took me awhile to acknowledge that perhaps I suffered from depression (after all, shouldn’t I feel blessed? Which just made me feel guiltier and more depressed). At the time, I found a good resource that helped me understand my feelings and start traveling out of the darkness.

I wish I would have had Hope Prevails Bible Study: Insights from a Doctor’s Personal Journey Through Depression by Dr. Michelle Bengston. Not only has Dr. Bengston traveled through depression, she has experienced seasons of caregiving as well. In fact, her husband received a cancer diagnosis on the day her first book, Hope Prevails: Insights from a Doctor’s Personal Journey Through Depression launched last year. Dr. Bengston knows first-hand how caregiving can wear a person down and how maintaining a positive attitude of hope plays an important role in a caregiver’s life.

Dr. Bengtson graciously answered a few questions about the unique challenges that caregivers face.

What lies do caregivers need to be aware of both during and after a loved one’s illness?

Dr. Bengtson: Caregivers need to be aware of the lie that somehow our loved-one’s well-being depends on us. It doesn’t. God has them in His hand and He cares for them so much better than we ever could. We just need to cooperate with Him.

We also need to be aware of the lie that will scream that their healing isn’t permanent. Only God knows. So, we rejoice in the promise that God says that by His stripes we are healed. We don’t know if that will be this side of heaven or not, but we thank Him that God’s ways are best.

Caregivers also must be careful to guard against the lie that says that more we do, the better off they will be, or that no one can care for them as good as we can. We need to take time to rest ourselves so that we can care for them. And sometimes resting means delegating or allowing others to step in and help.

As a cancer caregiver yourself, what extra advice would you give a caregiver who struggles with hopelessness?

Dr. Bengtson: As a caregiver, we have to be careful to guard against hopelessness. We have to be careful not to let anxiety have a place in our mind. One of the best ways to do that is to repeat God’s promises out loud, such as Psalm 39:7 “”But now, Lord, what do I look for? My hope is in you.” and Isaiah 40:31 “but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.”

Go to Him. Share your burdens. He wants to help you carry them. He wants to be your strength. You do not have to go through this alone. Even when friends and family do not understand, he does!

Who Needs Dr. Bengtson’s Book

If you act as a caregiver to someone, I strongly recommend that you read this book as preventative maintenance! Traveling through a caregiving journey calls for extra fortifications—something this book provides. If you know a caregiver, consider giving the book to them as a gift. Often times caregivers look fine on the outside, but inside they feel lost and abandoned. The easy-to-use and understand Bible study takes the reader on a journey of hope. I found the play lists of hope-filled songs especially helpful. Dr. Bengtson has curated a wide variety of Christian music artists to help lift the listener’s spirits throughout the day.

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The Cost of Caregiving to Working Family Caregivers

Cost of Caregiving to Working Caregivers

by Samantha Stein
Many people like to say that being busy is a myth. No one is truly too busy, and it is all a matter of time management. However, I wonder if any of these people know what it is like to manage the cost of caregiving, holding down a paying job, and keeping a family together. All while fighting to maintain your own well-being in the process.

Achieving the fabled work-life balance becomes even more challenging if you put caregiving into the mix. Becoming a caregiver to a loved takes time, energy, and money. After all, not everyone can quit their jobs and dedicate their time to caregiving because the costs can quickly drain bank accounts.

This brings in a question that many ask: how can I manage the cost of caregiving, secure our nest egg, and maintain my health? All without leaving my job?

caregiver cost

Invest in Your Care Coverage Now

High-hour caregivers often face various health problems during or after caregiving. Some have even shared that their illnesses and conditions were developed or aggravated because of the demands of care.

As care costs in America continue to increase rapidly, it would be a wise financial move to purchase long term care coverage now while caregivers still have more room in their finances. To avoid confusion on what policies cover and how it works, refer to the Long Term Care Insurance Buyer’s Guide to determine if this type of coverage works best for you.

Bear in mind that it is always good to be prepared especially when the risks are too high. Long term care services are too expensive to leave to chance.

Research on Community Services

Communities and organizations offer various services that help working caregivers manage their tasks effectively. As these services are often free or offered at a low cost, caregivers and their care recipients can minimize the cost of caregiving substantially.

The problem comes when these public programs do not reach the notice of caregivers. This is why you should be vigilant in researching for possible benefits in your area. You or your loved one may fit the qualifications for benefits. You can also look into the National Council on Aging’s BenefitsCheckUp.org. This website helps older adults find benefits that match their needs.

Learn about the Benefits Offered by Employers

Some employers have made special adjustments to allow caregivers to manage work and their caregiving duties more easily. These programs and benefits depend on the company, so would have to check with your HR or your manager. However, the usual accommodations are working on flexible time, working from home, or additional paid leave of absences.

Final Thoughts on the Cost of Caregiving

It will be difficult to stay on top of your game, especially when you are dealing with the financial, emotional, physical, mental, and social costs of caregiving while keeping a steady source of income. In fact, studies show that three out of five working caregivers say that they have experienced at least one impact in their employment situation.

On more than one occasion, it will get overwhelming and stressful.

No one wants to experience caregiver stress and burnout. Keep in mind that in order to care for your loved ones effectively, you have to care for yourself too. Spending a day at a spa, or choosing to not hang out with friends in order to enjoy some much-deserved alone time might benefit you. Whatever you do, make sure to dedicate resources and time to keeping your well-being in place.

Vegan Cinnamon Apple Cake with Maple Frosting

applesauce

Part of living a less stressful life has to do with making healthier choices for your self and for your family.  After Pedro’s stem-cell transplant, we decided that we could do more to eat healthfully.  Over the next year, we completely cut white flour and white sugar out of our diet.  While this cake still has unhealthy things in it (sugar), the majority of the ingredients beat anything you’ll find in a boxed cake mix!

 Cinnamon Apple Cake with Maple Frosting

by Anita Strawn de Ojeda

Preheat oven to 350º

Grease and flour two 8-inch round baking pans (I use whole-wheat flour)

1/3 cup ground flax seeds (you can buy whole flax seeds and grind them in a clean coffee grinder)
¾ cup chopped dates (the dried kind work fine)
2/3 cup boiling water
Place the first two ingredients in a medium-sized mixing bowl and pour the boiling water over the top of them.  Wait a few minutes for the mixture to cool.
Add:
½ cup coconut butter, melted or softened
2 c. applesauce
3 c. whole wheat flour (I like to use Wheat Montana Prairie Gold)
2  teaspoons of cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
1 ½ Tablespoons baking powder
¾  teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 ¾  c. brown or raw sugar

Beat all ingredients for three minutes on medium-high speed and pour into prepared pans.  Bake for 35-45 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean.
Let cool in pan for ten minutes and then remove from pan and allow to cool thoroughly before frosting.
 

Maple Frosting:

¼ cup coconut butter, melted
2 cups powdered sugar
1 teaspoon maple flavoring
½ teaspoon vanilla
2 Tablespoons cool water
Mix until smooth and use immediately to frost the cake (I use about a fourth of it to hold the two layers together).

 

applesauce

Cake so yummy, no one will know it's #vegan! Click To Tweet

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What’s your inspirational story? Link up below, and don’t forget the 1-2-3s of building community:

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31 Ways to Nurture Yourself for Caregivers

nurture

The Importance of Self-Care Increases with Caregiving

If you spend time caring for someone else, you need to make sure that you spend thoughtful time caring for yourself. This month on my other blog, I’m writing a series on 31 Ways to Nurture Yourself. So often people tell caregivers, “Take time to take care of yourself,” but in the stress of caring for someone else, caregivers can’t figure out what exactly that means.

You can find ideas, as well as the psychology behind self-care and self-nurturing over at www.anitaojeda.com.

A fellow caregiver, Karen Sebastian, also has a great series (this one designed especially for caregivers), called the ABCs of Self-Nurture for Caregivers.

Julie Steele has a series about mothering one’s self. You’ll find great ideas for self-care.

Tammy McDonald has a series on grief that might interest you, too.

If you do nothing else today to care for yourself, take the time to visit one of these series and glean some great ideas on how to take care of yourself! Remember, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t have the energy and patience to take care of someone else!

If you don't take time to care for yourself, you won't have the energy and patience to care for… Click To Tweet

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A Different Kind of Caregiving

SchoolOutdoor School Present

I watch as the sky turns from city glow to deep blue. None of the students stir, and traffic flows by like a roaring river (even this early). Finally the clouds behind the campsite change from vague shadows to glorious pink.

In the quiet of the morning, the stress starts to wash away. For the past six weeks, the students and I have planned for this day, this week. They decided what time they would need to leave school in order to arrive in San Diego by 4 in the afternoon (4 a.m., they said). They decided what they would like to visit and learn about on this Urban Jungle Expedition.

Today we go on a whale watching tour, and visit the USS Midway. Tomorrow, we’ll take in the Living Coast educational center and a beach. Many of them have never seen the ocean before. Wednesday, they will venture out into the city on their “Choose Your Own Adventure Day.” Using public transportation, they will travel to points of interest that they didn’t want to miss. The only caveat? They have a $10.00 budget. (Don’t worry, a staff member will travel with each group). Thursday, they’ll hit the zoo. “I can’t wait to see a lion,” one young man told me yesterday.

Outdoor School Past

For the past two years, I’ve done the bulk of the planning for outdoor school. Sure, they kids had choices about which hike or which class they wanted to take. But I made most of the decisions. I figured they should enjoy whatever I planned and go with the program because I’d done stuff like this before.

The results? We had fun. The kids loved the hikes, activities, and programming. But the trips took forever and kids dawdled at rest stops.

This time, the bus arrived 20 minutes early and everyone hustled through the bathroom lines at the rest areas. Students have told other staff members how much they appreciate getting to make choices and plan things.

Caregiver Lessons

In teacher mode, I’ve forgotten a basic human need. People (even students), like to have input. They like to feel as if their thoughts and ideas matter. It makes them happier about the situation–even if camping isn’t their thing.

And that’s a good reminder for caregivers. How can we involve and engage the ones we care for in the decisions? How can we make it a journey together rather than a journey for? I’d love to hear your ideas in the comments section!

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What’s your inspirational story? Link up below, and don’t forget the 1-2-3s of building community:

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Is Anyone in Your Pool Drowning in Plain Sight?

drowning

Is Anyone Drowning in YOUR Pool?

Drowning victims and caregivers have more in common than one might think. In this five-part series we explore the phenomena of “Drowning in Plain Sight.” As you read, think about the people in your ‘pool’—is anyone drowning?

‘Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.’ Characteristics of the Instinctive Drowning Response—’On Scene’, The Journal of U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue

Diagnosis and Deliverance

downingSomewhere, between diagnosis and deliverance, I forgot how to breathe. I find myself, at odd moments, holding my breath—not in anticipation or fright, but simply because I have forgotten the rhythm of breathing.
I didn’t know about my loss until I started experiencing horrible, unexplainable pain in the middle of my chest that felt like a heart problem.

“You’re as healthy as a person half your age,” the cardiologist told me.

Really? Than why does it hurt to breathe or have my heart beat strong and deep?  Why does my left side swell up?  When my malady strikes, it hurts to lie down or stand up.  Why does it happen over and over again?

“You have superior lung capacity with normal breathing function,” the internist told me.

Than why did it hurt to breathe?  Why couldn’t I take a deep breath without agony?  Walking up the stairs presented a cruel form of torture.

“Have you ever considered acupuncture?” my family practitioner asked me.

Really?  Alternative therapy?  I couldn’t believe a physician suggested alternative therapy.

“Well, I do go to a chiropractor and a massage therapist,” I admitted.

“Does it help?” she asked.

“I’m not sure.”  I shrugged. “Sometimes it helps the pain go away if I go in early, sometimes it doesn’t. My massage therapist claims that I have incredibly tight muscles on my left side. It takes her an hour to work through the knots.”

Have you forgotten how to breathe? It might be killing you. Click To Tweet

The Million Dollar Question

“Do you know how to breathe?” my neighbor and friend asked me. She’s a life coach, and helps people with chronic pain—she also suffers from chronic pain. “I can teach you how to breathe.”  I reluctantly agreed to go over to her house after work one evening.

“It’s called diaphragmatic breathing,” she told me. “Put your hand right below your rib cage and try to push your hand out when you breathe.”  I felt silly, but I tried it. “When you breathe shallowly, you decrease your body’s ability handle pain.”

“Really?”

“Yes.”  She launched into the technical reasons why shallow breathing keeps a person from processing pain and releasing endorphins that help the body take care of pain. I thanked her and wandered out of her house, hand on stomach, practicing my breathing while thinking of breathing in general.

Over the next few weeks, while I waited for my pain to go away, I caught myself not breathing. The computer didn’t load fast enough, family members failed to put their own dishes in the dishwasher, or I got cut off on the highway. Each time I found myself breathing shallowly through clenched teeth.

Somewhere, between diagnosis and deliverance, I had started holding my breath—in fright, in anticipation of the next piece of bad news, in mental pain and agony, in emotional stress. No one ever warned me that a side effect of all that stress would be a loss of breathing.

In fact, no one warned me about any of the side effects of a cancer diagnosis. Slowly, ever so slowly, I put a name on the side effects and started dealing with them. For now,

Many thanks to my incredible next-door-neighbor, Becky Curtis.  If you suffer from chronic pain, find hope on her website Take Courage Coaching.

Share Your Stories!

Inspire Me Monday Instructions

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Easy Sweet Potato Quesadillas Smothered in Tomatillo Sauce

Vegan and Gluten-free (if you wish)

quesadillas

Healthy Food Choices Inspire Me

Healthy (er) food choices always inspire me. Take, for instance, lowly quesadillas. I’d never even heard of them until I started college, and after we married, we often ate them because they only took a few minutes to prepare. Somewhere along the way, we started adding beans to them, because all that cheese might taste good, but we knew it probably didn’t help our overall state of health.

I’ve been playing with quesadilla recipies for twenty years now, and this one wins every time.

Vegan Quesadillas?

I know, ‘vegan quesadillas’ sounds like an oxymoron. But in our family, anything that comes to the table in a folded-in-half-crispy-tortilla is a ‘quesadilla’. If you’re not vegan, add some cheese if you can’t stand eating a ‘quesadilla’ without the queso! Or, try it without—it’s quite tasty and a family favorite.

quesadillas
Print

Sweet Potato Quesadillas with Tomatillo Sauce

If you'd like to try the gluten-free version, simply use corn tortillas instead of whole-wheat tortillas.

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4
Author Anita Ojeda

Ingredients

  • 3 Sweet Potatoes Peeled and grated. We use the lighter-skinned ones.
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1 jalapeño chopped (remove the seeds and pith is want a more mild flavor)
  • 2 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 1 tsp. salt add more if desired
  • 1/2 cup cilantro chopped

Instructions

  1. Heat a very large non-stick frying pan or a cast iron skillet on medium-high heat. Once it’s hot, add the oil and then cumin seeds. When the cumin seeds turn brown, lower the heat a little and add the onions, jalapeño and garlic. Stir occasionally until the onions are almost caramel colored.

    quesadilla
  2. Add the sweet potatoes and the 1/3 cup of water and stir everything together before covering the skillet. Every 3-5 minutes, remove the lid and stir the mixture. Cooking time will depend on which type of sweet potato you used (the lighter ones will take a little longer). When the sweet potatoes are almost cooked (they will be tender), add the salt and chopped cilantro and stir well.

  3. While the sweet potatoes cook, start the tomatillo sauce.

Print

tomatillos

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 6-7 to matillos
  • 1 shallot or ¼ cup chopped onion
  • ½ jalapeño
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • ¼ cup blanched slivered almonds
  • 3 Tbs. cilantro
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 tsps. chicken-flavored seasoning I like Bill’s Chickenish Flavoring.

Instructions

  1. Peel the papery layer from the tomatillos and rinse the tomatillos. Cut them into large wedges or circles. Cut the shallot, jalapeños and garlic into large chunks (everything will be blended, so you don’t have to chop anything into fine pieces). Heat a medium, non-stick or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil and then all of the chopped veggies. Stir and then lower the heat to medium. Stir occasionally. 

    quesadillas
  2. When the veggies start to look ‘roasted’, add the almonds and cook for another two minutes. 

  3. Put the water, salt and chicken-flavored seasoning into a high powered blender (I have a BlendTec) and then add the ‘roasted’ veggies. Blend everything until it’s semi-smooth. Taste and add more salt, if needed.

  4. To assemble the ‘quesadillas’: Heat a lightly greased skillet or griddle to medium and lay your favorite brand of whole-wheat tortillas on the griddle and place about ¾ a cup of the sweet potato filling on one side of the tortilla (pretend it’s cheese 😉 ). Fold the tortilla in half and repeat with the other tortillas. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, and then top with two tablespoons of the tomatillo sauce and serve hot.

Recipe Notes

We prefer whole-wheat tortillas.

Try this #meatlessmonday #sweetpotato #quesadilla! Tasty and you could even try it #vegan! Click To Tweet

If you’d like to know why we eat the way we do, check out the Healthy (er) Choices Manifesto.

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What’s your inspirational story? Link up below, and don’t forget the 1-2-3s of building community:

1. Link up your favorite posts from last week!

2. Visit TWO other contributors (especially the person who linked up right before you) and leave an encouraging comment.

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The Cost of Caregiving: Losing Your Place

placeCaregivers Lose Their Place

When Pedro received a non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma diagnosis in the Spring of 2002, I had no idea that I’d joined a community that had no place to call home. Hundreds of thousands of family caregivers—from teenagers to octogenarians—belong to the community, but we often feel as if we don’t fit in.place

In the hospital, we don’t speak the vocabulary that the medical professionals sling around as if we understand. At church, we become “So-and-so’s unfortunate mother/father/wife/husband/sister/brother/child.” People stop asking us how our loved one fairs, because, well, who wants to hear bad news all the time?

Some caregivers give up their place and their jobs to move home to take care of aging parents. Others relocate their family or add extra travel to their already busy lives.

Worst of all, we focus all of our energy on the one we care for—forgetting that we must take care of ourselves first, or we will have nothing left to give.

A Place for Caregivers

Whether you currently care for someone, or consider yourself a ‘recovering caregiver,’ this place is for you! We’d like to invite you to poke around the blog and see if any of the stories resonate with you. Even though caregiving feels lonely, you are NOT alone.

If you prefer a more interactive community, join us on Facebook at our secret Blessed (but Stressed) caregiver’s group. The community is small right now, but we’d like to create a space for current and recovering caregivers to support each other.

If you know a #caregiver that could use some #community, send them our way! Click To Tweet

If you’re not a caregiver, you might know one who would enjoy the community—send them our way! Together, we can share our stories and learn how to take care of ourselves so that we can better serve the ones we love.

Inspire Me Monday Instructions

What’s your inspirational story? Link up below, and don’t forget the 1-2-3s of building community:

1. Link up your favorite posts from last week!

2. Visit TWO other contributors (especially the person who linked up right before you) and leave an encouraging comment.

3. Spread the cheer THREE ways! Tweet something from a post you read, share a post on your Facebook page, stumble upon it, pin it or whatever social media outlet you prefer—just do it!

Don’t forget to visit the other #InspireMeMonday host site: www.anitaojeda.com

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The Tricky Part of Psalm 91

How Caregivers Can Apply the Promises

trickyGetting to the Tricky Part of Psalm 91

In the final part of this series on Psalm 91 and the caregiver, we arrive at the tricky part of the psalm. Why do I call it tricky? Well, a simple perusal might cause someone to say, “Hey, I believe in God but bad stuff happens to me. How can I really believe in God?” It’s all about the context. The author of this psalm wrote it for a specific reason and to a specific audience (some scholars believe King David was the intended audience). Nevertheless, we can take the principles of the psalm and apply them to our own lives.

First, the Condition

Verse nine starts with a condition.

9 If you say, “The Lord is my refuge,”
and you make the Most High your dwelling,

In other words, we have to do two things. We must claim God as our refuge and we must make the Most High our dwelling. But what exactly does that mean?

The first condition means that we have to acknowledge a higher power (and we won’t find it in ourselves or another person). We have to choose to let God do what he wants to provide refuge, or recourse for our difficulties, for us.
And once we make that choice, we have to continue to make the choice to let God handle things. If we don’t commit over and over again, then we fail to ‘make the Most High our dwelling.’

Next, the Promises

10 no harm will overtake you,
no disaster will come near your tent.

Verse ten sounds wonderful, doesn’t it? Harm will not overtake us—that’s another way of saying ‘overwhelm.’ So, harm might accost us, but when we take refuge in God and dwell in him, it won’t drown us.

I have a different take on disaster than some people might. The dictionary defines ‘disaster’ as “complete or terrible failure.” So even though bad things have happened to me and to the ones I love, I can say with assurance that God has kept disaster at bay.

11 For he will command his angels concerning you
to guard you in all your ways;
12 they will lift you up in their hands,
so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.
13 You will tread on the lion and the cobra;
you will trample the great lion and the serpent.

I love this part of the promise—God will surround us with the kind of protection that he knows we need the most. Back in David’s day, he had to worry about things like lions, cobras, and stubbing his sandaled feet on sharp rocks. Or maybe those three things represent petty annoyances, powerful people, and the devil.

At different times in our lives, any one of the three could overwhelm us—and God has instructed his angels to protect us from whatever will weaken our faith.

God has instructed his angels to protect us from whatever will weaken our #faith. Click To Tweet

More Conditions and Promises

trickyThe psalm ends with two more conditions—we must love the Lord, and we must acknowledge his name. If we do that, God will answer us when we call on him, he will walk with us through trouble, and he’ll deliver us in an honorable way. In addition, he’ll satisfy us with a long life—because salvation means no matter how soon we leave our mortal bodies, we’ll still have heaven.

14 “Because he loves me,” says the Lord, “I will rescue him;
I will protect him, for he acknowledges my name.
15 He will call on me, and I will answer him;
I will be with him in trouble,
I will deliver him and honor him.
16 With long life I will satisfy him
and show him my salvation.”

I guess there’s nothing really tricky about the Bible. But we do need to study it, the context in which it was written, and ask the Holy Spirit to help us apply the principles to our lives today.

Takeaways for Caregivers:

1. We have to do four things: claim God as our refuge, dwell in him, love God, and acknowledge his name.
2. God desires for us to trust him and let him work out our problems (what a relief!).
3. Worry and stress can take years off your life. Let God handle the seemingly insurmountable problems.

Inspire Me Monday Instructions

What’s your inspirational story? Link up below, and don’t forget the 1-2-3s of building community:

1. Link up your favorite posts from last week!

2. Visit TWO other contributors (especially the person who linked up right before you) and leave an encouraging comment.

3. Spread the cheer THREE ways! Tweet something from a post you read, share a post on your Facebook page, stumble upon it, pin it or whatever social media outlet you prefer—just do it!

Don’t forget to visit the other #InspireMeMonday host site: www.anitaojeda.com

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